Mor Hafren: Energy Recovery Facility

Received 16 November 2020
From Steven Brown

Representation

I believe this proposal, to build an incinerator in an area of Wales where several incinerators already exist, and are running at below full capacity, fails to comply with the basic waste management principles of Directive 2008/98/EC in 2 areas:

- That waste be managed without endangering human health and harming the environment, and in particular without risk to water, air, soil, plants or animals, without causing a nuisance through noise or odours, and without adversely affecting the countryside or places of special interest.

- That waste should be dealt as locally as reasonable possible in accordance with the 'Proximity Principle'


That waste be managed without endangering human health and harming the environment, and in particular without risk to water, air, soil, plants or animals, without causing a nuisance through noise or odours, and without adversely affecting the countryside or places of special interest.

- The proposed site is surrounded by a Site of Nature Conservation Interest (SNCI), and within 425 meters of the start of a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Untold damage will be caused to the plants and animals of the area by the operation of this proposed incinerator.

- The substantial increase of vehicular traffic to the proposed site will significantly increase diesel and noise pollution.

- The operation of the incinerator, and 24 hour operation of the electricity generator, will have a perpetual tinnitus effect on resident and wildlife in these SSSI and SNCI areas, driving protected animals away from the area, causing long term psychological damage, forcing residents to remain behind closed doors and windows in their own homes.

- Despite being informed that the chimney emits nothing more than water vapour, multiple internet articles relating to incinerator operation indicate that chimneys also emit organic substances such as dioxins, heavy metals such as cadmium and mercury, dust particles and acid gases such as sulphur dioxide and hydrochloric acid.

- Whilst we were assured at the public consultation meeting that the emissions from the incinerator would be within 'legal limits', when operating within expected parameters, they were unable to indicate the frequency, scale or severity of instances when these legal limits have been exceeded by other, similar incinerators, merely indicating that strict timescales apply to the timeframe within which the fault must be corrected. Meanwhile, residents and wildlife within the surrounding area will be exposed to these carcinogenic emissions.


That waste should be dealt as locally as reasonable possible in accordance with the 'Proximity Principle'.

- We were informed that source waste materials would be brought to the site from the whole of South Wales, despite there being many existing incinerators operating at less than maximum capacity within South Wales, and in contradiction with the 'proximity principle'.

- Additionally, representative of the company planning the development were unable to rule out transportation of waste from further afield, including parts of England.